After a programming frenzy from November 26 to January 6, the games are in for Indie Speed Run. The contest for indie game developers is one of the newest out there, in the spirit of Ludum Dare. It is hosted by The Escapist, and judges include Marcus “Notch” Persson, Ron Gilbert, Kellee Santiago, and Ben “Yahtzee” Croshaw. Judging will be ongoing until January 31, and the winner of the $2,500 prize will be announced February 5.

Among the 182 games that pulled through, there are some good ones in the mix. Unlike some of the other contests out there, this one has an entry fee ($25), so it seems developers put a bit more into them.

We took some time to sift through the new stack of games, and picked a few that seem promising. These are all downloadable games, so be sure to also check out the browser-based games.



With a camera view that is delightfully reminiscent of FTL: Faster Than Light, Chasm puts you in control of a submarine and its crew. You need to outrun an enemy and reach your goal, and as an added twist, you’ll need to keep an atmosphere of trust among your crew who seem to be going a bit mad.

Hardhat Ninja


The world isn’t what it used to be, and even ninjas need a day job. In Hardhat Ninja, you’ll play as one such ninja, who does construction by day. But being at work doesn’t mean you can’t sneak around a bit. You’ll need sneak your way around a construction site because, well, you’re a ninja, and that’s just what ninjas do.



This is an interesting find in a set of games created in such a short time span. Throne is a MMO with a persistent world.  The game looks like your average roguelike, but with an art style that resembles a pen sketch on a torn piece of paper. You can create up to four characters, set up your own server, and join other players in its online world.


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This is a simple submarine game that has you exploring the ocean’s depths, and catching fish. DSV has some pleasantly simple graphics, and some nice dynamic lighting. As you go deeper, the game gets more difficult, as light begins to fade and you have nothing but a few spotlights to navigate the abyss.

Spin Cycle


You can never have enough ninja games. Spin Cycle follows the story of a ninja out for revenge on the aerial submarine docks of Neo Tokyo. The game is inspired by Super Meat Boy, and so has gameplay that may seem familiar. As the name suggests, you’ll also be doing plenty of spinning, which gives you angular velocity and makes you go really fast.

We So Lost – Help Us Make Our Indie Speed Run Game!


With its pixelated characters sitting at their pixelated desks, this game could have gone a lot further if the developers took it more seriously. But still, it’s an interesting concept. We So Lost – Help Us Make Our Indie Speed Run Game! has you doing just what the title suggests—you’ll be helping a group of pixelated developers make a game for Indie Speed Run.



While it’s not much to look at, Alphanauts is one of the more promising games on Indie Speed Run. The follows a group of alphanauts who are trying to survive long enough to scan dangerous rooms as they’re barraged by black holes. You’ll control up to 26 characters, you can move several at once, and if one of them dies they’ll turn into a black hole. If you try to call up a dead character, you’ll bring painful memories to his fellow teammates and his skeleton will then come after them. Madness! Madness, I say!

Unpolished Turd


This is one of the few games on the contest that doesn’t have a rating yet, and with a name like “Unpolished Turd,” it doesn’t seem like the developers think very well of it. But wow, does it look cool. Unpolished Turd is an exploration game without a whole lot of story, but some cool art. You’ll play in a world filled with Navi fairies who are also into raves.

Steampunk Ninja


Yes, it’s another ninja game—ninjas and submarines seem to have dominated the submissions—but it’s a fun ninja game. Steampunk Ninja puts you in control of a ninja who uses kinetic energy as his powers. The developers say they decided to scrap the fighting elements to make it into an ultra high speed platformer.



Here’s an interesting concept. Psychopomp has you playing as Charos, the great caretaker of souls as you ferry them into the afterlife. The problem is that years on the job have taken their toll, and you’ve fallen insane. Now, rather than control your fabled boat, you now use Dante, the soul train, and you’ll be jumping from rail to rail with souls trailing behind you.


About The Author

Joshua Philipp is the Chief Editor of, and a technology editor and reporter at The Epoch Times. He values narrative and seeking out untold stories.