I’m always glad to see open-world adventure games in the works—particularly one that’s breaking from the common thread by bringing in elements from point-and-click adventure games, and Ourfirg does just that. Although the game is still early in development, it could have potential, and is currently on Kickstarter.

Ourfirg is a story-driven game where, according to Andreas Diktyopoulos, the game’s lead developer, you’ll take the role of an adventurer from a mystic monk society, and “As the story unfolds, the player becomes a witness to the eternal battle between good and evil; and guides his hero to the fulfillment of his divine destiny.”

The developers pull their inspiration from some of the classic LucasArts point-and-click adventure games—particularly LOOM. “We consider our game as a new 3D approach to the game design of the LOOM,” said Diktyopoulos, noting that the first version of the game was called “Loom.”

Diktyopoulos said that from the beginning, he and the team had a goal to create a game that’s simple, yet unique. The game is an adventure game, much in the flavor of some of the older point-and-click adventures, but with an open world and style similar to a simplified Elder Scrolls game.

“We try to simplify the typical adventure game interface without losing the sense of interaction with the world and tell a unique story,” Diktyopoulos said.

While taking the open world approach, they’re also trying to break free from some of the rules that have been set by the format, and bring in new elements from adventure games. “We are happy that adventure games market has started to grow again and we hope to see more indie games with various interesting ideas that could even lead in a change in the whole video games market,” Diktyopoulos said.

Ourfirg is currently on Kickstarter. It will be available for PC and Mac, and iOS, as well as Linux and Android if the game reaches its funding goals.

About The Author

Joshua Philipp is the Chief Editor of TechZwn.com, and a technology editor and reporter at The Epoch Times. He values narrative and seeking out untold stories.

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